In the wake of the disgusting ideological battle between various reprehensible groups in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Saturday — which included the Ku Klux Klan and white supremacists — the liberal media pounced on President Donald Trump to demand that he yet again denounce and disavow the groups, not-so-subtly insinuating that he supported them if he didn’t.

Though the media refuses to admit it, Trump has denounced those particular groups multiple times over the years, and has done so once more. Yet, that same sort of insistence on repeatedly distancing oneself from the odious racialists was never similarly thrust upon Hillary Clinton, the most recent presidential nominee of the media’s darling Democrat Party.

Indeed, Breitbart recalled that as recently as 2010, then-Secretary of State Clinton issued a sort of eulogy via video for the passing of Democrat West Virginia Sen. Robert Byrd, a veritable pillar of the party for decades whom Clinton fondly described as “my friend and mentor.”

Prior to his political career, Byrd was not just a member, but a local leader of the KKK in West Virginia, organizing and opening a chapter in his hometown in the early 1940s and serving as a top recruiter for the hateful group, according to a 2005 piece by The Washington Post.

Byrd was chosen as the leader of his local chapter and was given the title “Exalted Cyclops,” later to be honored as a “Grand Kleagle” for his recruitment efforts at bringing in new members to the organization. 

kkjklkj kl909i jj

In a memoir likely intended to downplay his role in the Klan during the 1940s, Byrd admitted to using the group as a platform from which to launch his political career, and though he claimed to have left the group just a few years after joining, some of his actions in the following years would seem to suggest otherwise.

For example, prior to his time in the Senate, Byrd composed a letter in 1945 to a fellow Democrat segregationist in the Senate that was exceptionally critical of then-President Harry Truman’s efforts to integrate the U.S. military. “Rather I should die a thousand times, and see old Glory trampled in the dirt never to rise again,” he wrote, than fight our nation’s enemies “with a Negro by my side.”

Fast-forward nearly 20 years, and then-Sen. Byrd led the Democrat opposition to the 1964 Civil Rights Act, even filibustering the bill for an astonishing 14 hours straight. Just a few years later, Byrd proudly voted against the nomination of Thurgood Marshall to the Supreme Court in 1967, the first black justice appointed to serve the country on the highest court.

To be sure, Byrd often apologized for his activity in the Klan, calling it an “albatross around my neck.” Democrats and the media, of course, more or less gave him a pass on it while holding others, particularly Republicans, to a much higher standard on their affiliation with the group.

One such instance when Byrd was allowed a pass, on something that would have ended the career of anyone else, was during an interview in 2001 during which the “esteemed” Senate leader used the phrase “white n***ers” to describe those who were still hung up on racial issues, according to CNN. He later apologized and blamed it on a “phrase (that) dates back to my childhood.”  Naturally, he was excused.

Coming back full circle to Hillary Clinton, and her fond eulogy of her “friend and mentor,” we hear her praising his “eloquence” and “nobility” as the “heart and soul” of the Senate, noting how she “sought out his guidance” and “wisdom,” lamenting that “we will not see his like again.”

Imagine if Trump had said anything even vaguely resembling those remarks about a former member of the Klan, or even someone merely suspected of being tangentially associated with such beliefs, and the uproar from the liberal media would be deafening.

This is nothing short of weapons-grade hypocrisy, but we won’t be holding our breath waiting for the media or liberals to demand a full repudiation of Byrd and his ilk from Clinton.

Please share this on Facebook and Twitter so everyone can see what Hillary Clinton had to say about Robert Byrd, a former KKK leader and racist senator from West Virginia.